Progress

3 02 2009

I haven’t had a lot to say lately…sorry.

But, this morning, as I was catching up on my blog reading, a new thought struck me.

Two years ago, when Indianapolis and Chicago met in the Super Bowl, the big talk leading up to the game was the two black coaches.  Never before had a black man coach his team to the Super Bowl, and in that year, two of them accomplished the feat.  I must have heard this topic discussed a hundred times in the two weeks leading up to the big game.  And, of course, Tony Dungee went on to become the first african american man to actually win the Super Bowl.02032009-tomlin

Sunday, Mike Tomlin, became the second African American coach to lead his team to a Super Bowl victory.  And, you know what?  Maybe it’s just me, but I haven’t heard a single mention of that fact.  I have heard all about his leadership, his youth, the way he relates to the players.  But, not a single utterance of the fact that he is black.  In just two short years, this has gone from an historic headline that dominated the media to a relative afterthought.

And, you know what?  I am glad.  I am celebrating the fact that the color of a man’s skin has gone more or less unnoticed while his achievement has not.  That, to me, is progress.





Rock, Paper, Scissors

1 12 2008

I have a question for you sports fans.  If Rock smashes Scissors and Paper covers Rock and Scissors cuts Paper, then which one has the highest BCS ranking?

12012008-rock-paper-scissors





This was the kid

20 05 2008

Today was a very sad day. I have posted before about the Jubilee Kids Club program Hurricane Cupcakesthat my friends and I have started at the Samaritan Inn here in McKinney. Well, today we got word that one of our little buddies at the Inn was involved in an off-site accident in which he drowned. This little boy was one of the first kids we met back in February. He was so vibrant and full of life.

This was the kid that was so full of life and energy that we had to keep a special eye on him because you just didn’t quite know what he was going to do next.

This was the kid that nearly had to be restrained inside the building one cool morning in March while we made him wait for someone to bring him a jacket.

This was the kid that just wanted to go outside and play. He just wanted to play. He just wanted to play and play and play.

This was the kid that couldn’t wait to get outside in the sun. He played on the swing. He played in the yard. He played football. He played kickball. He played soccer. He played basketball. He played all of the above…at the same time.

This was the kid that played basketball with me on a make-shift basket out in the playground over and over and over again….and then we played again. We must have played 20 times. And, guess who won every game? That’s right, and he not only beat me every time, he smoked me.

This was the kid that made me laugh because he liked to make up new rules each time I got the basketball… the same rules that for some reason or another might or might not have applied to him when he got the ball.

This was the kid that when I asked him which basketball player he was, he said Reggie Bush! I asked him what NBA team Reggie Bush played for, but he didn’t hear me because he was already on to something else.

This was the kid that wore slippers for his Air-Jordans and a white tank top for his jersey.

This was the kid that had two beautiful sisters that we all thought were twins. But, it turns out, one was his twin and the other was their older sister.

This was the kid that came to Dallas with his family from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. They were trying to make their way in a new place and in a new school and in a new kind of whirlwind.

This was the kid that we brought cupcakes for in April because we knew we were coming on his and his sister’s birthday. We were sad when they weren’t there that day. We had to enjoy the cupcakes without them.

This was the kid that ultimately left this world too young, too early, and with too much playing left to do.

This is the kid that my friends and I will dearly miss.

This is the kid that I will think about everytime I shoot a basket in that make-shift goal out in the playground.

This is the kid that I will remember everytime I see Reggie Bush run for a touchdown as I wonder if he would make a good basketball player.

This is the kid that I will honor with every cupcake I eat.

This is the kid that I hope to see again someday in a better place. A place without homeless shelters, a place without hurricanes, a place with no need for jackets to go out and play, a place where everyday is a celebration of someone’s birthday, a place where his smile will last for a few thousand years and then a few thousand more.

A place we can both call home together.